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Outdoor Wedding or Event Venues

“Make Me Wanna Shout!*”

outdoor wedding venue designWedding and event spaces are great opportunities to allow your landscape design imagination to soar. These are fantasy outdoor spaces. The bride is a princess and you get to create her kingdom. Have fun designing them!

Provide a solid parking lot area. Be sure to make wheelchair accessible seating and circulation available. Provide a place for refuge from inclement weather. A covered pavilion is a nice addition. Furnish plenty of seating space and tables. You will need a location for electronic equipment to be set up safely.

An outdoor wedding event space is an outdoor cathedral or ballroom. It needs walls. Connect your design with outdoor scale. Go big! Use large evergreen vegetation for enclosure and as a backdrop for temporary decorations.

One way to make things easier for decorators is to create PVC sleeves along both sides of the aisles for arbors and shepherd hook posts. Then they can be easily removed and replaced as needed. Expensive floral arrangements and garlands can be carried indoors during stormy weather and brought back out just before the ceremony begins. This gives every group the opportunity to create their own custom decorating style.

Bike Paths

Share the Road

bike path designBike paths can be great amenities for adjacent neighborhoods if they are designed nicely. Multi-use paths need to be eight to ten feet wide. Try to preserve as many trees as possible when grading for new paths. Occasional shade canopy is an important part of the pleasure of biking.

A bike path is a linear park. Restricted access sometimes makes sense, but usually, the more people and activity near a path, the safer it is. Lighting can also add to the public safety of the path. Communities need alternate ways of getting from one place to another, rather than depending on automobiles. A safe, excellent path system is a draw for economic development.

Complete screening with fences or walls of a bike path can create new, big problems that can make it dangerous to use. Adding vegetative screening for a bike or multi-use path can add safety issues, too. Try to keep paths open to visual checks from passing cars and police patrols.

A local government entity or homeowner’s association should budget for bike path maintenance, with regular reports of pavement status and issues as a part of every public meeting.

Landscaping Steep Slopes

Holding Your Ground

landscaping steep slopesSlope rations for planted areas are a critical consideration for the establishment of plant material. For planting, a slope ratio of one foot of drop for every four feet of horizontal distance, called “four-to-one” (4:1) slope, or flatter, is best. Most of the time, the area beyond the graded platform for hardscape structures is steeper than that. Here are some general rules for deciding what to do with steep slopes.

Any slope steeper than “three-to-one” (3:1), is difficult or dangerous to mow. Trying to establish turf grass on slopes so steep is difficult, too. For steeper slopes, use vigorous ground covers, or a mixture of vigorous shrubs and native grasses to hold the soil. Another option is to use large masses of Juniper shrubs. They have long, low, spreading forms that do a good job of holding slopes on commercial properties, where professional maintenance crews can use a custom spray program to reduce typical Juniper pests and special pruning techniques to keep their spikes dense and weed-free.

Early March is the Time for Topdressing

The Perfect Filler

turf and cow manure

Just before your turf grass begins to green up for a new season, topdress low spots and depressions in the lawn with cow manure or sand mixed with cow manure. The gentle fertilizer provides just the right amount of encouragement for grass to grow and fill in bare spots, too. Layer on as much as possible without covering the tips of the new grass blades. 

 

Retaining Walls

Safety is the Key Design Element

retaining wall design

Retaining walls must hold steep slopes. The only reason you don’t see them used more often as a feature is because they are so expensive.

Retaining walls can be both a beautiful and functional part of a landscape. Gabion walls are boulders contained in wire grids. They can be used in inexpensive ribbons or mattress shapes to provide slope stability in difficult situations. They can be made more attractive with live stakes or other vegetation inserted between the openings in the walls. Concrete retaining walls are massive slabs of gray, but they can be made more attractive by incorporating attachment ties along the façade for adding a decorative face. Textured forms can build in interesting surfaces on concrete wall surfaces. Modular units are often used to build attractive and easy-to-construct terraces. 

Retaining walls can be dangerous. If a wall is over four feet tall, a landscape architect must call in a civil engineer for design assistance. Walls can fail, and when they do, they can fail in a large way, posing a hazard to people and property.

Gravity walls are massive structures that use large stone units, battered back about one-half inch each top course to form a slanted wall. They hold back soil through sheer weight. Most gravity walls are low. Because it is difficult to gauge how well they can do their job, the chance of damage during unusual storm events is high. A “dead man” can be added to hold the wall in place, by keying perpendicularly to the hillside. Railroad tie walls use T’s made from additional ties and secured to the wall to do this.

Larger retaining walls are reinforced concrete with rods or interlocking keys. Additional geosynthetic fabric is often used every few feet, woven into the layers of backfill to add strength. Modular units can vary in quality, so shop carefully and choose wisely. Good pieces typically weigh over fifty-five pounds each.

How Different Plant Shapes Create Excitement in Your Landscape Design

Sameness Equals Boring

vary plant shapes for exciting landscape design

Different plant shapes create excitement in your landscape design. Sameness equals boring, so mix up the plant shapes and textures. Ornamental plants come in all shapes. Thank goodness for that! You need the contrast of spikes with mounds and the juxtaposition of flat forms with pendulous cascades. Before you send out a finished landscape plan for bid, do a quick review of the plant material chosen to be sure you provide the right amount of contrasting shapes—not too busy, and not too plain.

A landscape is a lot like a giant, outdoor floral arrangement. Create some drama with different shapes. A formal, squared-off hedge looks better against a carefully-shaped evergreen mound at the end of the row. An amorphous tall shrub becomes a star growing above a mass of weeping facer plants falling over their shared planter. A sharply-spiked focal point is grounded with a low, flat ground cover.

Use the natural shapes of plant material to reinforce the structural design of the garden. Tall, columnar conifers can pierce the vertical space to indicate stopping points for circulation. Undulation of eye-level, layered masses can lead garden visitors along a path. Spreading limbs can soften the hard lines of pavement or walls.

Remember, plants in real life don’t look like the ones in kindergarten pictures—simple balls of green. The varieties of shape and form are plenty, and provide lots of choices for the accomplished landscape designer. 

Landscape Definition

There is No Design without It

define landscape forms with clear definition of edges and boundariesEstablish boundaries and the outline of your design by defining the edges of the elements with which it is composed. There is no place for wimpy gestures in professional landscape design!

Make a clean line on the ground plane using edging, different materials, or changes in height and color.

Create a silhouette on the horizon and frame important structural elements.

Control the eye by defining the path it should follow toward a dramatic focal point.

Landscape design should not only be deliberate (form follows function), it should appear very deliberate. Define the forms with strong visual edges and lines.

Designing the Landscape for a Large Industrial Site

Utility, Utility, Utility

designing the landscape for an industrial siteMy first years as a professional landscape designer came during a local boom in industrial growth. I took part in the design of over thirty manufacturing facility landscapes. My first irrigation system design was for a site of more than fifty acres. It can be intimidating, and mistakes can be on a huge scale, too! I learned through experience what was effective and what didn’t work, because I was fortunate enough to see my designs implemented and mature.

Go big or go home? Not necessarily. Designing a large industrial site is different from planning the landscape for a commercial property or college campus. It’s all about utility. The final design must meet several goals.

Design for public relations. An industrial site is typically established through political moves and local economic investment. It must convey stability without extravagance. Large masses of evergreen plant material is needed to hold the design together. Groves of trees and trees that outline drives should be placed in a manner that directs the visitor to the main entrance and reception area. Excessive use of seasonal flowers sends a message of wastefulness. Concentrate annual color within large entrance planters, and keep the rest of the open space plantings as woody ornamentals. Frugal elegance should be the theme.

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